Nothern

Northern Regions of France

From Authie Bay to the Belgian border, the northern regions,draw people and communities together for unforgettable experiences.

An active, earthy, rich and populous, that stretches along the Channel and the North Sea 120 km of a coastline where milky hues were baptized “Côte d’Opale”. Opal sand, chalk cliffs, coaxing the wild sea, Pastel shades. Transparent brightness. Zero monotony.

The coast is low at both ends: Marquenterre Picard south, maritime Flanders in the north; Here, the dunes are retained by tufts of marram grass, there are lodgepole pines, controling and protecting the wind swept sands. Then the coast cliffs notes caps Gris-Nez and Blanc-Nez, where it cuts the bulge of Artois. In the hinterland, the hollow of a valley, the bottom of a forest, mossy walls of a citadel asleep conceal many treasures because that page of history has been written in these cities and these beaches!

Yet more varied than the Belgian and Dutch coast, the crowded beaches are a Mecca of European tourism, the shore of French North has not yet made its full of tourists, and the space is not measured at bathers on the huge sandy beaches. Tourists, however, are more numerous every year. Venus not only neighboring large cities and relatively nearby capital, but everywhere, they run on this coast once reserved for the working people of the settlements and sick children. Boundless beaches, clean air and lively, vigorous iodized spaces … The Côte d’Opale perhaps less attractive than others, but it retains its natural beauty.

Paris Ile-de-France, located in the smallest region of the country — and yet it is the most well known. Situated in northern France and on the Seine River, Paris is one of the most historically, culturally and artistically significant and rich centers of the world. Of course, as a visitor to the city of light, you will have many, many destinations to choose from,

 

Normandy regions 2 and 3

Today, the area that was once the dukedom of Normandy is divided into two administrative regions – Lower Normandy, (Basse Normandie) capital Caen, comprising the departments of Calvados (14), Manche (50), and Orne (61). and Upper Normandy (Haute Normandie), capital Rouen, with its two departments, Eure (27) and Seine Maritime (76),

 

Nord – Pas-de-Calais Region 4

is a region bordered on the north by the English Channel and the North Sea, on the northeast by Belgium, and on the south by Picardy. It is made up of just two departments, the Nord (59) and the Pas de Calais (62). In historic terms, this region covers most of what was once the French part of Flanders, and the old province of Artois. Yet if we are to be quite honest, it is not a region that people in France tend to think of in terms of tourism.

Picardy – or Picardie Region 5

Consists of three departments, the Oise (60), capital Beauvais; the Aisne (02) capital Laon, and the Somme (60), whose capital Amiens, is also the regional capital. In historic terms, the southern part of this modern region, including virtually all of the Oise department, was not part of the Province of Picardy, but was added to the region when it was created in the twentieth century.

Paris Ile-de-France, Region 6 

 

Essonne 91   Hauts-de-Seine 92  Paris 75  Seine-et-Marne 77  Seine-Saint-Denis 93  Val-d’Oise 95  Val-de-Marne 94‎  Yvelines 78

Paris is the tiniest department of France, located in the smallest region of the country — and yet perhaps it is the most well known. Situated in northern France and on the Seine River, Paris is one of the most historically, culturally and artistically significant and rich centers of the world. Of course, as a visitor to the city of light, you will have many, many destinations to choose from, but you can’t leave the city without paying a visit to some of the places mentioned here. The Eiffel Tower is perhaps the first place you will want to, and indeed have to, visit. Enjoy a breathtaking panoramic view from up on the top floors, from where you will see most of the other places you will visit. The Champs-Elysées, the world-famous avenue — and one of the most expensive strips of real estate — the Louvre Museum, home to over 7,500 works of art, including Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa; the Notre-Dame Cathedral; Place de l’Opéra, a public square that was part of the Haussmannian restructuring of the city under Napoleon III; Place Vendôme, commemorating one of Napoleon I’s battle victories; the Arc de Triomphe; Saint-Germain-des-Prés, located in the sixth arrondissement of Paris and once a center of the existentialist movement; the Montmartre district, home to the Sacré-Cœur Basilica; and the famous Latin Quarter, home to the Sorbonne University, among many others.

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